17 Street Photography Tips From The Professionals (3 of 3)

This is a continuation of our 17 Street Photography Tips From The Professionals series. You can visit part 1 here. Part 2 is here.

12. Get Down on Their Level
Change up your height for some interesting shots. Get down low to see the city the way the animals do. You can create an image of intense hustle and bustle by lowering yourself to the street level. You can also take photos from up above for more interesting shots.
13. Continuous Drive Mode is Your Friend
You’ll want to keep your camera on your shoulder to look less conspicuous, but you want to be ready for any shot. Keep your camera on continuous drive mode to ensure your camera is ready for all the action.

14. Don’t Overuse the Viewfinder
Don’t look through the viewfinder all the time. Take a few shots without even looking at your camera. Don’t take your camera off your shoulder; simply point and click. You might get total rubbish shots, or you might find yourself surprised.
15. Make Some Friends
Don’t be afraid to interact with your subjects. You want a selection of both candid and non-candid shots. You can even get some semi-candid shots by interacting. Talk to the bartender at a street bar, and ask him some questions about his family. When he responds, you can capture his emotions. Ask someone for directions to get a great shot of the person pointing or looking confused.

16. Narrow in on One Subject
Your DSLR has the ability to narrow in on one subject while blurring out the rest. Show a feeling of calm in the chaos by using this technique on one person for a dramatic effect. This technique works well with street performers and other subjects you want to spotlight.

17. Avoid the Police
It’s illegal to take photos of certain buildings. Police officers don’t love seeing photographers taking photos of other officers, government buildings or buildings that have higher security risks. Steer clear of these subjects – or at least don’t draw too much attention to yourself while filming these.

If a police officer approaches you, be as polite as possible. Offer to show your photos to the officer. While it’s not illegal to photograph a police officer, you don’t want to cause trouble or ban yourself from photographing in one area.

Mix and match these techniques to get photos that look great and have plenty of depth. The number one rule to street photography is to plan well in advance. This is a situation where an ounce of planning goes a long way.

This was part 3 of 3 for the street photography tips from the professionals series. If you haven’t seen the other parts, visit them at the link below.

PAGE 1: street photography tips part 1
PAGE 2: street photography tips part 2
PAGE 3: street photography tips part 3

streetfeat

About the Author

streetfeat

Street Feat Photography was created to provide you with the most important street photography information and pictures.

Follow streetfeat:

Leave a Comment:

All fields with “*” are required

Leave a Comment:

All fields with “*” are required